General David G. Perkins

Commanding General
U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command

General David G. Perkins assumed duties as Commander, United States Army Training and Doctrine Command on March 14, 2014 after serving as Commander, United States Army Combined Arms Center, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.

General Perkins was the 21st Commander of the United States Army Combined Arms Center from November 2011 to February 2014, where he was the lead for synchronizing leader development across the Army, the management of the Army’s training support and training development enterprises, and the development and integration of the doctrine the Army uses to fight and win our Nation’s wars.

Previously General Perkins served as the Commanding General of the 4th Infantry Division (Mechanized) where his primary mission was to assist and develop the Iraqi Security Forces in U.S. Division-North to take security responsibility following the transition of U.S. Forces from Iraq. General Perkins also served as the Brigade Commander for the 2nd Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division (Mechanized) during the invasion of Iraq, commanding the unit’s “Thunder Run” into Baghdad and subsequent stability operations in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom, where he earned the Silver Star, the nation’s third highest award for valor.

General Perkins was commissioned into the Armor Branch upon graduation from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1980. In addition to the posts noted above, he held leadership positions in armor and mechanized infantry units in Europe, the United States, and the Middle East. He also held a number of key staff assignments, including Deputy Chief of Staff for Strategic Effects for Multi-National Forces-Iraq, Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations for United States Army Europe, and Special Assistant to the Speaker of the House, United States House of Representatives.

General Perkins holds a Bachelor of Science Degree from the United States Military Academy, a Masters Degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Michigan, and a Masters Degree in National Security and Strategic Studies from the Naval War College.

General Perkins was born in New Hampshire.



11:15 KEYNOTE: DESIGNING THE FUTURE ARMY TO CREATE A VERSATILE, TAILORABLE FUTURE FORCE

·          Multi -Domain Battle: Achieving cross domain synergy
·          Army Capabilities in the Multi-Domain Battle: Cross-domain operations in context of Joint Combined Arms Maneuver that create temporary windows of superiority across multiple domains, and allow Joint Forces to seize, retain, and exploit the initiative.
·          Combat Vehicle Modernization Strategy; Formations possess the appropriate combination of mobility, protection and lethality to win and achieve overmatch against likely threat, under anticipated mission variables
·          Designing the Future Force
 

18:30 DAY 1 CLOSING PANEL DISCUSSION: THE STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP DEBATE

We now live in a seemingly much more complicated world; cyber-attacks, asymmetric warfare, terrorism at home and abroad/ The Nation states’ monopoly on the use of force has been eroded and non-state actors have become increasingly powerful drivers of change.
To generate both a breath of knowledge and a depth of insight, the panel discussion will feature the most senior officers and strategic decision makers who are setting the long-term strategies on the future direction of land power and armoured capability
 
Aim: To investigate the balance of capabilities required within future Land Forces.
 
Method:
·          To hear perspectives from very senior military officers regarding their assessments of national and collective capabilities required to meet expected future challenges in the LAND Environment.
·          Subsequent discussion should take into account the range of military roles from War fighting, Counter Insurgency and Stabilisation to Peace Support and Humanitarian Assistance, and the Challenges presented by Hybrid and Ambiguous Warfare. 
·          Discussion will also consider the utility of Armoured Forces against the spectrum of requirements, and how they might contribute to an appropriately balanced Land force.